21 April 2017

A New Daphne

"Daphne has escaped the god's embraces, which promising love would but result in ungraceful fertility." - T. E. Hulme

Like a ray of light from an unlikely source, comes this quote from T.E. Hulme.    Only the fanatic reader of English poetry or the dogged scholar now remembers  T(homas) E(rnest) Hulme today. This surprised me when I went looking for his poems recently; I remembered Hulme from my high school English literature studies.   More familiar is the term Imagism, invented by Ezra Pound to describe a new kind of poetry,  but it was Hulme who supplied the theoretical ballast.  Not that Hulme wrote that much poetry, but that he did write impressed the right people:  Ezra Pound and Robert Frost, who attested to Hulme's influence on his own work after they met in London in 1913.

That same ray of light is captured in  Imaginary Beings (Daphne) a sculpture recently created by  Neri Oxman using colored digital powders and other materials that were programmed through a 3-D printer.  Daphne appears in several ancient Greek texts, including in Ovid's Metamorphosis, but all agree that she was a water nymph who attracted the amorous god Apollo, a misfortune that led this sworn virgin  to appeal to her father to rescue her so, being a god himself, he turned her into a tree.

Oxman's Daphne glows from within,  usually portrayed as a woman with branches sprouting from her head and arms, here she becomes a source of light herself, the thing that makes photosynthesis possible, and bursts forth in ruffles of leaves.  When you realize that glass is composed of particles of silicate it is not so surprising that Oxman's bits of colored powders looks so much like glass.  You could think of this as a 21st century form of alchemy.

Oxman, who is an architect, has thought long about what makes for good design. At the MIT Media Lab, she  has created digital versions of morphological objects, combining the forms and structures of biological organisms with elements from architecture  to create objects that Oxman has characterized as 'Material Ecology.'  So common that we barely notice it, much less give it a name, designers have long used elements from nature  as their inspiration in  a process known as biomimicry.  But now, using computer assisted design programs (CADs), people like Neri Oxman and the Mediated Matter Group at MIT are able to produce algorithms that translate their two-dimensional ideas into three-dimensional art objects,

Oxman grew up in Haifa, Israel,  among architects and engineers so, from an early age she saw her American father and Israeli mother designing things.  She enrolled in medical school but then switched to architecture.  At MIT, Oxman has been  developing 3-D printers that can layer molten glass, in the way that they currently work plastics or polymers.  Her work was featured in a 2016 exhibition at the Cooper-Hewitt Smithsonian Design Museum in New York,

For further reading;
1. Tashima Etsuko: Learning From Nature, at The Blue Lantern, 25 March 2016.
2. Survival of The Beautiful by David Rothenberg, New York, Bloomsbury Press: 2011.

Image:
Neri Oxman & Mediated Matter Group, Imaginary Beings (Daphne), 2011, Museum of Modern Art, NYC.

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